Species Profile

Bowhead Whale Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort population

Scientific Name: Balaena mysticetus
Other/Previous Names: Bowhead Whale (Western Arctic population)
Taxonomy Group: Mammals
Range: Arctic Ocean
Last COSEWIC Assessment: April 2009
Last COSEWIC Designation: Special Concern
SARA Status: Schedule 1, Special Concern


Go to advanced search

Quick Links: | Photo | Description | Habitat | Biology | Threats | Protection | Other Protection or Status | National Recovery Program | Documents

Image of Bowhead Whale

Bowhead Whale Photo 1
Bowhead Whale Photo 2

Top

Description

The Bowhead is a baleen whale that is mainly blue-black in color, with a very large head, great mouth and large lips. This species has the longest baleen (keratinous plates in place of teeth) of any living whale - up to 4 m in length. There are cream-colored blotches on the lower part of the jaw; white blotches on the belly; and a pale grey area on the tail. These whales can attain a length of 20 m; females are larger than males. The blubber on these whales is very thick and can measure up to 45 cm deep. At birth, a calf measures 4 m in length.

Top

Distribution and Population

Bowheads have a nearly circumpolar distribution in the Northern Hemisphere, north of about 55° N and south of the permanent polar ice cap. However, several physical barriers, possibly in combination with oceanographic features such as temperature variations and current patterns, and competition with other whales for food or space, divide the total Bowhead population into four or five separate stocks. In Canada, the Bowhead Whale was historically found in the western Arctic, in the area of the Beaufort Sea, and in the eastern Arctic in the areas of Davis Strait, Baffin Bay and Hudson Bay. Today the western population of the Bowhead is found in the Beaufort Sea / Arctic Ocean area, primarily along the south and west coasts of Banks Island, in the Amundsen Gulf, near the Baillie Islands, and along western Tuktoyaktuk Peninsula. In the Eastern Arctic, Bowheads are present off southeastern Baffin Island and towards the Greenland side of Davis Strait during the winter and early spring; as the ice breaks up some move westward to northwest of Baffin Island and some move along the east coast of Baffin Island. There are also Bowheads in Hudson Strait from fall to spring, and in the waters between northwestern Hudson Bay and northern Foxe Basin during the summer. The International Whaling Commission's 1991 estimate of the size of the western population of the Bowhead Whale was 7500 whales, compared with an estimated 14,000-20,000 whales prior to commercial whaling. The Eastern Arctic stock is even more seriously depleted: only about 250 whales remained in the Baffin Island area in 1991, compared with at least 11,000 in the early 1800s. The number of Bowheads in the Hudson Bay area is thought to have been much less in 1991 than in 1860, when at least 500-600 whales summered there. Throughout the range of the species, the total population in 1991 was probably less than 10,000 whales, or about 15% of the pre-whaling abundance.

Top

Habitat

The Bowhead Whale inhabits Arctic waters, and prefers the environments of bays, straits and estuaries. It is always found near the ice edge, migrating north and south as the ice retreats or expands.

Top

Biology

Very little is known about the reproduction of the Bowhead whale. It is thought that Bowheads give birth every three or more years, that effective mating takes place mainly in late winter, and that most calves are born in the spring. Bowheads are slow swimmers, which made them more vulnerable to hunting in the days before engine-driven boats and explosive projectiles. Feeding Bowheads commonly dive for 30 minutes, with dives separated by short periods spent near the surface, blowing air. At other times they are very active on the surface, slapping the water with their flippers, raising their flukes, and leaping high to fall back with a large splash. Bowheads are among the more vocal of baleen whales. Groups of up to 15 individuals, scattered over an area of 10-20 sq.km, probably maintain acoustic contact with one another during migration. They may also use the reverberations of their calls off the undersides of an ice floe to help them judge its dimensions. Within Bowhead populations, the smaller sub-adults appear to feed separately from adults during the summer months, preferring to remain closer to shore. Bowheads feed almost entirely on small invertebrate animals that occur in dense swarms, concentrating on organisms with very high energy content, such as copepods and euphausiids. Bowheads avoid or escape predation from Killer Whales either by sheltering in an ice-infested area, since they are much more maneuverable around heavy ice than Killer Whales are, or by heading for shallow water.

Top

Threats

The severe depletion of the Bowhead stock by whalers is the main reason why this species is now endangered throughout the world. These whales are still harvested in Alaska. It is possible that climatic factors which influence ice conditions may also affect both the survival and the distribution of Bowhead Whales. Offshore developments in the Beaufort Sea may be an additional problem: both the traffic and the noise associated with such developments can adversely affect whale populations.

Top

Protection

Federal Protection

More information about SARA, including how it protects individual species, is available in the Species at Risk Act: A Guide.

In Canada, the Cetacean Protection Regulations of 1982 protect the Bowhead whale; the killing of Bowhead whales without a license has been prohibited in Canada since 1979. An exemption makes it possible for aboriginal peoples to continue hunting the Bowhead, but this hunt is subject to quotas. Internationally, the International Whaling Commission regulates the hunting of Bowhead Whales through the establishment of quotas.

Provincial and Territorial Protection

To know if this species is protected by provincial or territorial laws, consult the provinces' and territories' websites.

Top

Other Protection or Status

In the United States, the Bowhead whale is listed as an endangered species and protected under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.

Top

Documents

PLEASE NOTE: Not all COSEWIC reports are currently available on the SARA Public Registry. Most of the reports not yet available are status reports for species assessed by COSEWIC prior to May 2002. Other COSEWIC reports not yet available may include those species assessed as Extinct, Data Deficient or Not at Risk. In the meantime, they are available on request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

14 record(s) found.

COSEWIC Status Reports

COSEWIC Assessments

  • COSEWIC Assessment - Bowhead Whale (2005)

    Bowhead whale (Hudson Bay-Foxe Basin population) The "Eastern and Western Arctic populations" were given a single designation of Endangered in April 1980. Split into two populations (Eastern Arctic and Western Arctic) to allow separate designations in April 1986. The Eastern Arctic population was not re-evaluated in April 1986, but retained the Endangered status of the original "Eastern and Western Arctic populations." The Eastern Arctic population was further split into two populations (Hudson Bay-Foxe Basin population and Davis Strait-Baffin Bay population) in May 2005, and the Hudson Bay-Foxe Basin population was designated Threatened. Last assessment based on an update status report. ________________________________________________________________ Bowhead whale (Davis Strait-Baffin Bay population) The "Eastern and Western Arctic populations" were given a single designation of Endangered in April 1980. Split into two populations (Eastern Arctic and Western Arctic) to allow separate designations in April 1986. The Eastern Arctic population was not re-evaluated in April 1986, but retained the Endangered status of the original "Eastern and Western Arctic populations." The Eastern Arctic population was further split into two populations (Hudson Bay-Foxe Basin population and Davis Strait-Baffin Bay population) in May 2005, and the Davis Strait-Baffin Bay population was designated Threatened. Last assessment based on an update status report. ________________________________________________________________ Bowhead whale (Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort population) The "Eastern and Western Arctic populations" were given a single designation of Endangered in April 1980. Split into two populations (Eastern Arctic and Western Arctic) to allow separate designations in April 1986. The Western Arctic population was designated Endangered in April 1986. The population was renamed to "Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort population" and designated Special Concern in May 2005. Last assessment based on an update status report.
  • COSEWIC Assessment - Bowhead Whale (2009)

    The Bowhead Whale (Balaena mysticetus) (Linnaeus 1758) is a large baleen whale of the family Balaenidae. The body is mainly black with variable white regions on the chin and tail.

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - Bowhead Whale, Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort population (2009)

    The population was severely depleted by commercial whaling from 1848 until about 1915, a period of about 65-70 years. Since 1915, it has been subject to regular hunting for subsistence by Aboriginal people in Alaska (USA) and Chukotka (Russia) and occasional hunting by the Inuvialuit of the western Canadian Arctic. In the absence of commercial whaling, this population has been recovering and was estimated at 10,400 in 2001. Nevertheless, it is not yet clearly secure because of its life history (e.g. long generation time, very low natural growth rate) and the possible impacts of habitat changes. There is uncertainty about how bowheads will respond to the rapid changes in their habitat due to climate change and increasing human activities such as shipping and oil exploration in high latitudes. Such habitat changes have already begun to occur and will intensify over the next 100 years. In view of the species’ life history, it is important that hunting continue to be monitored and managed to ensure against over-harvest.
  • Response Statements - Bowhead Whale (2005)

    This population was hunted to low levels during commercial whaling. Although supporting a regulated hunt, it is recovering and is currently at about 50% of its historical population size. The population is not yet secure and is potentially negatively affected by climate change, and by oil and gas development.

Management Plans

  • Management Plan for the Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort population of Bowhead Whale (Balaena mysticetus) in Canada (2014)

    The bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus) (Linnaeus 1758) is a large baleen whale of the family Balaenidae and possesses a nearly circumpolar distribution. Bowhead whales occur in Arctic and subarctic marine waters and in conditions ranging from open water to extensive pack ice. Two of the four recognized populations of bowhead whales are found in Canada. One of these populations, the Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort population, summers in the eastern Beaufort Sea and Amundsen Gulf and winters in the eastern and central Bering Sea.

Orders

  • Order Acknowledging Receipt of the Assessments Done Pursuant to Subsection 23(1) of the Act (2007) (2007)

    This Order acknowledges receipt by the Governor in Council of the assessments of the status of 40 species done pursuant to paragraph 15(1)(a) and in accordance with subsection 23(1) of the Species at Risk Act (SARA) by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). The purpose of SARA is to prevent wildlife species from being extirpated or becoming extinct, to provide for the recovery of wildlife species that are extirpated, endangered or threatened as a result of human activity and to manage species of special concern to prevent them from becoming endangered or threatened.
  • Order Amending Schedule 1 to the Species at Risk Act (2007)

    Her Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to section 27 of the Species at Risk Act, hereby makes the annexed Order Amending Schedules 1 to 3 to the Species at Risk Act.
  • Order Extending the Time for the Assessment of the Status of Wildlife Species (2006)

    The time provided for the assessment of the status of the wildlife species set out in the schedule is extended for 3 years from the day on which section 14 of the Species at Risk Act comes into force.

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2005 (2005)

    2005 Annual Report to the Canadian Endangered Species Conservation Council (CESCC) from the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada.
  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2009 (2009)

    2009 Annual Report to the The Minister of the Environment and the Canadian Endangered Species Conservation Council (CESCC) from the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada.

Consultation Documents

  • Consultation on Amending the List of Species Under the Species At Risk Act: November 2005 (2005)

    The Government of Canada proclaimed the Species at Risk Act (SARA) on June 5, 2003 as part of its strategy for the protection of wildlife species at risk. Attached to the Act is Schedule 1, the list of the species that receive protection under SARA, hereinafter referred to as the 'SARA list'. Canadians are invited to comment on whether all or some of the species included in this document should be added to the SARA list.
  • Consultation workbook on the addition of one population of bowhead whale to the SARA List: Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort bowhead whales (2005)

    Your opinion is being sought to assist the government of Canada in making an informed decision on whether to add the Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort bowhead whales to the Schedule 1 (the List of Wildlife Species at Risk) of the Species at Risk Act (SARA). Your input on the impacts of adding this species to the List is important. This workbook has been developed to give you an opportunity to provide Fisheries and Oceans Canada with your feedback, advice, and other comments regarding adding this species to Schedule 1 of SARA (Schedule 1 identifies which species are legally protected under SARA).