Species Profile

Darkblotched Rockfish

Scientific Name: Sebastes crameri
Taxonomy Group: Fishes
Range: Pacific Ocean
Last COSEWIC Assessment: November 2009
Last COSEWIC Designation: Special Concern
SARA Status: No schedule, No Status

Individuals of this species may be protected under Schedule 1 under another name; for more information see Schedule 1, the A-Z Species List, or if applicable, the Related Species table below.


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Protection

Federal Protection

Provincial and Territorial Protection

To know if this species is protected by provincial or territorial laws, consult the provinces' and territories' websites.

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Documents

PLEASE NOTE: Not all COSEWIC reports are currently available on the SARA Public Registry. Most of the reports not yet available are status reports for species assessed by COSEWIC prior to May 2002. Other COSEWIC reports not yet available may include those species assessed as Extinct, Data Deficient or Not at Risk. In the meantime, they are available on request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

4 record(s) found.

COSEWIC Status Reports

  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Darkblotched Rockfish Sebastes crameri in Canada (2010)

    The Darkblotched Rockfish, a member of the family Sebastidae (rockfishes), is found along the Pacific coast of North America, with over 60 other species of rockfish (over 35 of which occur in British Columbia). Its common names include “blackblotched rockfish”, “blackmouth rockfish” and “blotchie”. In French it is called Sébaste tacheté or Sébaste crameri. Adults are distinguished by four to five discrete dark blotches on their back, and range in colour from white to pink or red. Darkblotched Rockfish have venom glands in their spines. Males grow faster than females, but females are larger once mature. The maximum length of the species is 58 cm. No genetic studies have been conducted on Canadian populations, but research along the US west coast (northern California to Washington) show that significant genetic structure exists and that gene flow is restricted to neighbouring populations. Overall levels of genetic differentiation, however, are low among these US populations. A single population or designatable unit is present in Canada.

COSEWIC Assessments

  • COSEWIC Assessment Summary and Status Report: Darkblotched Rockfish Sebastes crameri (2010)

    Assessment Summary – November 2009 Common name Darkblotched Rockfish Scientific name Sebastes crameri Status Special Concern Reason for designation This long-lived species (maximum age 100 years; generation length 23 years) demonstrates episodic recruitment events. The species is taken at relatively low levels in fisheries targeting more abundant rockfishes. Research surveys show no clear abundance trends, although information on abundance trends has relatively high uncertainty. In adjacent US waters, the species declined 84% from 1928 to 1999 and is considered overfished, although there has been some recent population recovery. Recent surveys do not account for population declines from foreign fishing prior to the 1970s. Occurrence Pacific Ocean Status history Designated Special Concern in November 2009.

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - Darkblotched Rockfish (2010)

    This long-lived species (maximum age 100 years; generation length 23 years) demonstrates episodic recruitment events. The species is taken at relatively low levels in fisheries targeting more abundant rockfishes.  Research surveys show no clear abundance trends, although information on abundance trends has relatively high uncertainty.  In adjacent US waters, the species declined 84% from 1928-1999 and is considered overfished, although there has been some recent population recovery. Recent surveys do not account for population declines from foreign fishing prior to the 1970s.

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2010 (2010)

    Under Canada’s Species At Risk Act (SARA), the foremost function of COSEWIC is to “assess the status of each wildlife species considered by COSEWIC to be at risk and, as part of the assessment, identify existing and potential threats to the species”. During the past year, COSEWIC held two Wildlife Species Assessment Meetings and reviewed the status of 79 wildlife species (species, subspecies, populations). During the meeting of November 2009, COSEWIC assessed or reviewed the classification of the status of 28 wildlife species. COSEWIC assessed or reviewed the classification of an additional 51 wildlife species (species, subspecies and populations) during their April 2010 meeting. For species already found on Schedule 1 of SARA, the classification of 32 species was reviewed by COSEWIC and the status of the wildlife species was confirmed to be in the same category (extirpated - no longer found in the wild in Canada but occurring elsewhere, endangered, threatened or of special concern). The wildlife species assessment results for the 2009-2010 reporting period include the following: Extirpated: 6 Endangered: 39 Threatened: 16 Special Concern: 17 Data Deficient: 1 This report transmits to the Minister the status of 46 species newly classified as extirpated, endangered, threatened or of special concern, fulfilling COSEWIC’s obligations under SARA Section 24 and 25. A full detailed summary of the assessment for each species and the reason for the designation can be found in Appendix I of the attached report. Since its inception, COSEWIC has assessed 602 wildlife species in various risk categories, including 262 Endangered, 151 Threatened, 166 Special Concern and 23 Extirpated. In addition, 13 wildlife species have been assessed as Extinct. Also, to date, 46 wildlife species have been identified by COSEWIC as Data Deficient and 166 wildlife species were assessed as Not at Risk. This year has been a particularly productive year for COSEWIC’s Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge (ATK) Subcommittee. In April 2010 COSEWIC approved the Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge Process and Protocol Guidelines, providing clear and agreed principles for the gathering of Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge to carry out COSEWIC functions as required under Section 15(2) of SARA (See Appendix III of the attached report). We are grateful for the rich and enthusiastic contribution made by community elders and experts in helping the ATK Subcommittee prepare the ATK protocols.