Species Profile

American Plaice Newfoundland and Labrador population

Scientific Name: Hippoglossoides platessoides
Taxonomy Group: Fishes
Range: Atlantic Ocean
Last COSEWIC Assessment: April 2009
Last COSEWIC Designation: Threatened
SARA Status: No schedule, No Status

Individuals of this species may be protected under Schedule 1 under another name; for more information see Schedule 1, the A-Z Species List, or if applicable, the Related Species table below.


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Protection

Federal Protection

Provincial and Territorial Protection

To know if this species is protected by provincial or territorial laws, consult the provinces' and territories' websites.

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Documents

PLEASE NOTE: Not all COSEWIC reports are currently available on the SARA Public Registry. Most of the reports not yet available are status reports for species assessed by COSEWIC prior to May 2002. Other COSEWIC reports not yet available may include those species assessed as Extinct, Data Deficient or Not at Risk. In the meantime, they are available on request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

5 record(s) found.

COSEWIC Status Reports

  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the American Plaice Hippoglossoides platessoides in Canada (2009)

    Hippoglossoides platessoides, commonly known as American Plaice in English and Plie canadienne in French, is a member of the Pleuronectidae, or right-eyed flounders. It also goes by a variety of other names, often commercially as flounder or sole and in Europe as long rough dab. The body is laterally flattened. As adults, both eyes are on the right side of the head and the animal lies on its left side. The eyed side is typically red to grayish brown and uniform in colour, whereas the blind side is white. The head is generally small but with a relatively large mouth.

COSEWIC Assessments

  • COSEWIC Assessment - American Plaice (2009)

    Hippoglossoides platessoides, commonly known as American Plaice in English and Plie canadienne in French, is a member of the Pleuronectidae, or right-eyed flounders. It also goes by a variety of other names, often commercially as flounder or sole and in Europe as long rough dab. The body is laterally flattened. As adults, both eyes are on the right side of the head and the animal lies on its left side. The eyed side is typically red to grayish brown and uniform in colour, whereas the blind side is white. The head is generally small but with a relatively large mouth.

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - American Plaice, Newfoundland and Labrador population (2009)

    This right-eye flounder burrows in sediment to escape predators and ambush prey. It is widely distributed on both sides of the North Atlantic Ocean, from the Barents Sea to the British Isles in the east, and from northern Baffin Island to Rhode Island in the west. This population occurs from Hudson Strait to the southern limit of the Grand Bank, and westward north of the Laurentian Channel to the southwestern corner of Newfoundland. A relatively sedentary, non-schooling species, it was likely once the most abundant flatfish in the northwest Atlantic, and the fishery for it in Newfoundland waters was once the largest flatfish fishery in the world. Over a 47 year time series, (about 3 generations) abundance has declined approximately 96%. Overfishing is a major cause of the decline, but an apparent increase in natural mortality in the 1990s, when the largest part of the decline occurred, may also have contributed. The decline now appears to have ceased, but numbers remain below a precautionary threshold estimated for this stock. The directed fishery is under moratorium but some significant and poorly regulated bycatches are negatively influencing recovery. In addition, fishing gear is size selective, cropping large individuals, and reducing population reproductive potential. There is evidence that natural mortality has increased which reduces the ability of the population to withstand fishing mortality.

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2009 (2009)

    2009 Annual Report to the The Minister of the Environment and the Canadian Endangered Species Conservation Council (CESCC) from the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada.

Consultation Documents

  • American Plaice - Consultations on listing under the Species at Risk Act (2013)

    The Species at Risk Act acknowledges that all Canadians have a role to play in preventing the disappearance of wildlife species. Before deciding whether any of these American Plaice populations will be added to the List of Wildlife Species at Risk, we would like your opinion, comments and suggestions regarding the possible ecological, cultural and economic impacts of listing or not listing these populations under the Species at Risk Act.