Species Profile

Rainbow Smelt Lake Utopia large-bodied population

Scientific Name: Osmerus mordax
Taxonomy Group: Fishes
Range: New Brunswick
Last COSEWIC Assessment: November 2008
Last COSEWIC Designation: Threatened
SARA Status: No schedule, No Status

Individuals of this species may be protected under Schedule 1 under another name; for more information see Schedule 1, the A-Z Species List, or if applicable, the Related Species table below.


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Protection

Federal Protection

Provincial and Territorial Protection

To know if this species is protected by provincial or territorial laws, consult the provinces' and territories' websites.

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Documents

PLEASE NOTE: Not all COSEWIC reports are currently available on the SARA Public Registry. Most of the reports not yet available are status reports for species assessed by COSEWIC prior to May 2002. Other COSEWIC reports not yet available may include those species assessed as Extinct, Data Deficient or Not at Risk. In the meantime, they are available on request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

5 record(s) found.

COSEWIC Status Reports

  • COSEWIC Assessment and Update Status Report on the Rainbow Smelt Osmerus mordax in Canada (2009)

    The Lake Utopia smelt constitute a genetically divergent pair of Rainbow Smelt Osmerus mordax endemic to a lake in southwestern New Brunswick. In general, smelt are small (typically less than 30 cm in total length), slender pelagic fish that vary in colour from pale green to dark blue on the back, and whose sides display a rainbow of blue, purple and pink iridescence. Smelt are north temperate fish capable of living in both freshwater and saltwater. Smelt that permanently reside in freshwater environments occur in a variety of morphologically, ecologically, and genetically differentiated populations, some of which occupy the same geographical location and are reproductively isolated from each other. The sympatric pair of smelt in Lake Utopia, New Brunswick consists of two such distinct populations that behave as separate species: a Small-bodied population and a Large-bodied population. Similar putative sympatric pairs are reported from a few other lakes in eastern North America, but molecular genetic data indicate that each pair has evolved independently by parallel evolution.

COSEWIC Assessments

  • COSEWIC Assessment - Lake Utopia Smelt (2009)

    The Lake Utopia smelt constitute a genetically divergent pair of Rainbow Smelt Osmerus mordax endemic to a lake in southwestern New Brunswick. In general, smelt are small (typically less than 30 cm in total length), slender pelagic fish that vary in colour from pale green to dark blue on the back, and whose sides display a rainbow of blue, purple and pink iridescence. Smelt are north temperate fish capable of living in both freshwater and saltwater. Smelt that permanently reside in freshwater environments occur in a variety of morphologically, ecologically, and genetically differentiated populations, some of which occupy the same geographical location and are reproductively isolated from each other. The sympatric pair of smelt in Lake Utopia, New Brunswick consists of two such distinct populations that behave as separate species: a Small-bodied population and a Large-bodied population. Similar putative sympatric pairs are reported from a few other lakes in eastern North America, but molecular genetic data indicate that each pair has evolved independently by parallel evolution.

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - Rainbow Smelt, Lake Utopia large-bodied population (2009)

    This population is part of a genetically divergent sympatric pair of Osmerus that is endemic to a single lake in Canada with an extremely small index of area of occupancy (6 sq. km). It spawns in only three (3) small streams in the watershed and could quickly become extinct through degradation of spawning streams from increasing development around the lake shore and impacts of the dip-net fishery. This population is threatened by introduction of exotic species and by increasing eutrophication.

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2009 (2009)

    2009 Annual Report to the The Minister of the Environment and the Canadian Endangered Species Conservation Council (CESCC) from the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada.

Consultation Documents