Species Profile

Bigmouth Buffalo Saskatchewan - Nelson River populations

Scientific Name: Ictiobus cyprinellus
Taxonomy Group: Fishes
Range: Saskatchewan, Manitoba
Last COSEWIC Assessment: April 2009
Last COSEWIC Designation: Special Concern
SARA Status: Schedule 1, Special Concern


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SARA
Status
Bigmouth Buffalo Non-active Special Concern

Quick Links: | Protection | National Recovery Program | Documents

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Protection

Federal Protection

More information about SARA, including how it protects individual species, is available in the Species at Risk Act: A Guide.

Provincial and Territorial Protection

To know if this species is protected by provincial or territorial laws, consult the provinces' and territories' websites.

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Documents

PLEASE NOTE: Not all COSEWIC reports are currently available on the SARA Public Registry. Most of the reports not yet available are status reports for species assessed by COSEWIC prior to May 2002. Other COSEWIC reports not yet available may include those species assessed as Extinct, Data Deficient or Not at Risk. In the meantime, they are available on request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

7 record(s) found.

COSEWIC Status Reports

  • COSEWIC Assessment and Update Status Report on the Bigmouth Buffalo Ictiobus cyprinellus in Canada (2009)

    The Bigmouth Buffalo is one of five species in the genus Ictiobus, and one of 18 sucker species and one of two, possibly three, Ictiobus species found in Canada. Buffaloes are superficially similar to the Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio) and Goldfish (Carassius auratus), but these species have stiff, serrated spines leading the dorsal and anal fins, and Common Carp also have barbels. Buffaloes can be distinguished from most other suckers of the family (Catostomidae) by their long, falcate (curved) dorsal fin.

COSEWIC Assessments

  • COSEWIC Assessment - Bigmouth Buffalo (2009)

    The Bigmouth Buffalo is one of five species in the genus Ictiobus, and one of 18 sucker species and one of two, possibly three, Ictiobus species found in Canada. Buffaloes are superficially similar to the Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio) and Goldfish (Carassius auratus), but these species have stiff, serrated spines leading the dorsal and anal fins, and Common Carp also have barbels. Buffaloes can be distinguished from most other suckers of the family (Catostomidae) by their long, falcate (curved) dorsal fin.

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - Bigmouth Buffalo, Saskatchewan - Nelson River populations (2009)

    Although there has been an increase in the extent of occurrence (EO) and area of occupancy (AO) in Manitoba, the species is apparently not abundant there. Dramatic declines in the Qu’Appelle River basin appear to be related to changes in water management practices that have led to elimination and/or degradation of spawning habitat and subsequent reduction in reproductive potential. Increasing demands for water for agricultural purposes may also be limiting for other population components in this Biogeographic Zone.

Orders

  • Order Acknowledging Receipt of the Assessments Done Pursuant to Subsection 23(1) of the Act (2010)

    Her Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of the Environment, hereby acknowledges receipt, on the making of this Order, of the assessments conducted under subsection 23(1) of the Species at Risk Act by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada with respect to the species set out in the annexed schedule.
  • Order Amending Schedule 1 to the Species at Risk Act (2011)

    Her Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to section 27 of the Species at Risk Act, hereby makes the annexed Order Amending Schedules 1 to 3 to the Species at Risk Act.

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2009 (2009)

    2009 Annual Report to the The Minister of the Environment and the Canadian Endangered Species Conservation Council (CESCC) from the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada.

Consultation Documents