List of factual corrections resulting from the 30 day public comment period

Study summary

Old text (div 1): As an example, the magnitude of potential impacts to mining, petroleum and natural gas, and forestry sectors within the SMC range represent approximately $30-40 billion in capital investment alone with associated spin-offs and job creation.

New text (changes are in bold font):  As an example, the capital investment, economic activity and associated job creation of the mining, wind power, petroleum and natural gas sectors within the Study area that has the potential to be impacted by caribou-related land use decisions exceeds $20 billion.  An additional $1 billion in economic activity in the forest sector has the potential to be impacted.

Old text (div 3): If the species and their habitat are not protected, the federal Minister of Environment and Climate Change must recommend to the Governor in Council (federal Cabinet) that protection be put in place. 

New text (changes are in bold font): If the species and their critical habitat are not protected/ effectively protected, the federal Minister of Environment and Climate Change must recommend to the Governor in Council (federal Cabinet) that protection be put in place. 

Old text (div 4): The analysis showed that none of the spatially-explicit legislative instruments considered in this study are in place over approximately 13% of high elevation ranges and 41% of non-high elevation ranges.

New text (changes are in bold font): The analysis showed that none of the spatially-explicit legislative instruments considered in this study are in place over approximately 10% of high elevation ranges and 44% of non-high elevation ranges.

Old text (div 5): Within the Central Group, recreational activities are not considered to be a widespread concern. Popular snowmobiling areas are limited in number, well established and believed to be unlikely to expand, based on preferred terrain and access constraints. Higher risk of critical habitat destruction would result when known high use recreation areas could facilitate predator access to or within low and high elevation habitat and/or intersect with a time and location when caribou are using the habitat.

New text (changes are in bold font):  Within the Central Group, recreational activities are not currently considered to be a widespread concern. Popular snowmobiling areas are limited in number as much of the windswept alpine habitat used by caribou is not ideal for snowmobiling. Nonetheless, snowmobiling in caribou winter range does pose some risk of disturbance, displacement, and improved access for predators. Monitoring high use areas will enable modifications to predator management or snowmobile use before impacts occur to caribou.

Full study

Old text (div 2.3): As an example, the magnitude of potential impacts to mining, petroleum and natural gas, and forestry sectors within the SMC range represent approximately $30-40 billion in capital investment alone with associated spin-offs and job creation.

New text (changes are in bold font):  As an example, the capital investment, economic activity and associated job creation of the mining, wind power, petroleum and natural gas sectors within the Study area that has the potential to be impacted by caribou-related land use decisions exceeds $20 billion.  An additional $1 billion in economic activity in the forest sector has the potential to be impacted. Footnote

Footnote: Capital investment and economic activity estimates are based on information gathered through the Environmental Assessment process and aggregate estimates from confidential information collected through internal BC government processes. Estimates are approximate for the Central Group area only. Estimates are of large projects and do not include GDP, capital investment, or economic activity for sectors or development outside of the mining, wind power, petroleum and natural gas development, and forestry sectors.

Old text (div 4.1): The spatial area to which none of the listed legislative instruments apply represents about 13% of the high elevation caribou habitat. The spatial area to which none of the listed legislative instruments apply represents about 41% of the area outside high elevation caribou habitat, which would be considered critical habitat by ECCC.

New text (changes are in bold font): The spatial area to which none of the listed legislative instruments apply represents about 10% of the high elevation caribou habitat. The spatial area to which none of the listed legislative instruments apply represents about 44% of the area outside high elevation caribou habitat, which would be considered critical habitat by ECCC.

Old text (div 4.1): In these areas, operators must still comply with the general provisions of FRPA, the Coal Act, OGAA, etc., and their associated regulations.

New text (changes are in bold font): In these areas, operators must still comply with the general provisions of FRPA, the Coal Act, OGAA, etc., and their associated regulations; major projects would also be subject to relevant environmental assessment legislation.

Old text (div 5.1.5): Within the Central Group, despite the amount of tenured area, recreational activities are not considered a widespread concern. Popular snowmobiling areas are limited in number, well established and believed to be unlikely to expand, based on preferred terrain and access constraints. Higher risk would result when known high use recreation areas transition between low & high elevation habitat and/or intersect with a time & location when caribou are using the habitat.

New text (changes are in bold font):   Within the Central Group, recreational activities are not currently considered to be a widespread concern. Popular snowmobiling areas are limited in number as much of the windswept alpine habitat used by caribou is not ideal for snowmobiling. Nonetheless, snowmobiling in caribou winter range does pose some risk of disturbance, displacement, and improved access for predators. Monitoring high use areas will enable modifications to predator management  or snowmobile use before impacts occur to caribou.